Tag Archives: Ugly Aarhus

der har jeg rod, derfra min verden går

Kære Aarhus,

It has been two years since we arrived. An unbelievable two years.

Making the decision to move here was difficult. Saying good-bye to my mother at the airport was heart-wrenching. I know a lot of people were surprised to see us move so far from home, but as my wise cousin said to me that was a decision that could only be made by those affected, and we didn’t have to justify it to anyone. Those words have given me more strength than I think she knew. I made my peace with my decision; though I won’t lie, there are moments of regrets. But I know my mother didn’t want her illness to hold us back. Like any mother really.

We stepped off the plane in Copenhagen, out into a taxi rank, tired, stressed, bewildered at the magnitude of what we were doing. Our son, M, then 18months old, produced two new words that first day, “windmill” and “cold”. Perhaps he understood what this country was about.
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It turned out that a free online course and the first season of Borgen were not great preparation for the reality of getting by amongst Danish speakers. I’ve come a long way since selvfølgelig seemed like the biggest tongue-twister out there. We went for a walk just after Christmas on a day with bitterly cold winds. My cheeks and lips were so numb I struggled to shape them into consonants. Perhaps this why Danish sounds the way it does. Though this would not explain why Norwegians speak so beautifully.

But the language barrier is not so great since virtually everyone speaks fantastic English. Even those that insist ‘only a little. Not very well’ before launching into complex sentences with multiple clauses and only making a mistake when they have to pronounce a ‘v’. Anti-waxers had me stumped for a while. But really Danes, you are very patient with our fumbling attempts to learn your language. At least you know nobody ever arrives on your shores with a high school level of Danish. So you welcome all these beginner level speakers.
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Or do you? It seems, based on your recent elections, you are becoming less tolerant. I think the stress of being more welcoming than most of Europe has become too much. You shouldered a larger burden of migrants while other countries turned their backs. And it has been hard for Denmark. When for so many centuries nobody wanted to come here. To this ‘lille land’. So for centuries there has been only one way to be Danish. All us migrants are changing that, and some of you want that to stop. But I think that horse has already bolted. And perhaps the greatest threat is not people who don’t eat flæskesteg for Christmas, or people who don’t celebrate Christmas, but your growing intolerance.

And we do try to be less ‘udansk’. I realise now we made some grave errors in decorating our apartment. We hung our lights in an incorrect way. You are right, they are not very hygge. Our furniture is not minimalist enough. But I have a Kähler vase now, so I hope that counts for something. I confess that two years here has not taught me to understand all your ways. Like the obsession with the light wood floors. Tell me Denmark, how do you keep them clean? Especially in winter, when the streets are salted and gritted and you have a pre-schooler? Is it possible? Or do you all sweep multiple times a day too?

Often the locals ask me ‘why?’ Why did we move here? To this land of winter, rain and wind. I admit on paper they seemed quite daunting. But looking closer Aarhus, you have half the annual rainfall of my home town. And while your wind is cold, it is hardly ever gale force. To my surprise it is easier to take a pre-schooler out here, in a cold, dry snow than in a boggy soggy Wellington winters’ day. Sure the summer is hardly spectacular, my Australian friends would be very unimpressed. But I find much to admire in your fierce embrace of what summer you get, – sun bathing on your decks at the first rays of sunshine, regardless of temperature.
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I love the seasons. The silver frosted trees -winter blossom my son called it- replaced by tiny green buds. The clichéd red, orange and brown cascades of leaves in autumn. It is the variation of light that I have learnt to enjoy the most. The long, long summer days with nights where the sky never goes truly black, only a deep blue, a promise of sunshine only a few hours away. To the grim grey of winter. I am always amused to find myself staring at a patch of cloud, only to realise that, yes that is the sun hiding behind it. I never understood that the sun would stay so low on the horizon that even day would be so dim. Or that the cloud would be so thick that the temperature does not vary from midnight to midday. But shift slightly either side of that grey, you have whole days where if the sun makes it out from behind the clouds it casts that beautiful magic hour glow you usually only get just before sunset.
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You’ll never win any beauty contests Aarhus, but there are places, views I have learnt to love. The dinosaur sunrises down at your industrial harbour. The Rainbow perched above the city. Those particular shades of orange and mustard yellow stucco on old cottages. Our nature walks along the Brabrandstein. I’ve learnt where to go to get a great coffee, and a pastry. Where to buy decent fish. Where to pick blackberries.
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These are perhaps the greatest achievements to me. That after two years I feel I have solved some of the great challenges of expat life. They are not just good coffee shops, but my favourite coffee shops. My favourite walks. My local shops. We have managed to turn the unfamiliar into the familiar.

I’ve written before about my wish to give my children turangawaewae. At times I have misgivings about our choices. I wonder if the costs have been too high. But today I think we have made roots here. We know our future here probably does not extend further than 2017, so they will never be deep. But this will always be the city my son spent his preschool years, the city my daughter was born in, the city I grieved my mother in. So I know I will look back and be able to say:

Aarhus, for a time at least, you were home.

K.H.

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Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside

Aarhus’s old town in nestled against an industrial harbour. Although some housing is beginning to be built there, it isn’t exactly a ‘seaside’ as I would think of it. Further afield are some lovely beaches. One of which, Risskov, I have visited briefly. A Dane told my parents that she had thought Aarhus was hilly, until she moved to Wellington. I realised after I arrived I had misinterpreted that. Denmark is very flat. Aarhus undulates gently. Not really steep, but steep enough you notice pushing a pram uphill. I’m pleased, after flat, inland Canberra, to find myself living in this topography. My son has not spent enough time in Wellington. Walking through the park he exclaimed ‘big hill’. Not exactly sweetie, but the locals might agree.

We live near the Botanical Gardens; it is a lovely park, but I’m not sure where the garden part kicks in. They are constructing a tropical dome there. From the outside it looks like it will be well worth visiting once it finally opens. One of the lovely things about Aarhus is that there are little parks and playgrounds everywhere. Even the playgrounds at daycare centres are open to the public after-hours. There are also paths between the villages and city centre for both cycles and pedestrian. It is a great way to get into town and to enjoy watching birds, and picking flowers.

The reality is that Aarhus is a surprisingly ugly city. My husband put it best when he said ‘it was pretty ugly for somewhere that wasn’t destroyed in WWII’. Buildings in the old town are mostly brick, and about 5 floors high. Sometimes you get a change from the brick, like around where we live, with concrete instead. Despite the undulating street level, the buildings are tall enough that sea views are rare. If it wasn’t for the sea gulls, and the icy blasts of wind, you wouldn’t know it was there.

I suspect our view is partly our cultural upbringing. After spending so much of my life overseas, I find the arrival into Wellington, with the view of villas perched on hillsides, especially beautiful. Much of the rest of the world has a uniformity in their housing stock that I find vaguely depressing, be it terraced housing in the UK or apartment blocks here. I found the new build suburbs of Canberra creepy, in a dystopic-Stepford-housewife kind of way. Hopefully I’ll get a bit used to it and it won’t bother me so much. Until then, I’ll just have to keep hunting out the bits I do like.